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Sat, Mar. 12th, 2005, 02:29 am
kben: (no subject)

Hey, guys, I haven't forgotten about y'all, I've just been bogged down with work.

I hope to have the next section (beginning Act One) up by this weekend.

Meanwhile, make sure your notes (if you have any, heh) are in order. :)

Thu, Mar. 3rd, 2005, 08:19 pm
kben: (no subject)

This week is the calm before the storm. Take this time to catch up and realize that we’re already 1/3 of the way through this workshop. :)

Things you should know before going into Act One:

- Main Character
o Who are they?
o What is their goal?

- Story
o Beginning, Middle, and End
o High Points

- Supporting Characters and Subplots
o Do they all serve the protagonist and the main plot?

Don’t freak out if you’re not 100% sure about all these things. Some element will grow with you as you write and a lot of them will be dramatically different by the time you’re finished.

If you have any questions about anything or want some feedback on what you’ve done up to this point, feel free to email me (kben@livejournal.com).

Also, don’t forget to bounce ideas of each other. It’s why we’re here.

Next week, we’ll start in on Act One.

Sun, Feb. 20th, 2005, 02:50 am
kben: Progress Check-In

Story idea I've chosen to work with:
Genre:
Main Character:

Thu, Feb. 17th, 2005, 06:22 pm
justmalea: My Three Loglines...

1) A young woman's identity-theft scheme backfires when she is institutionalized in place of her victim.

2) After the sudden death of her parents, a woman must attempt to come to terms with all of the family secrets and abuse that they harbored, but never dealt with.

3) A 20-something finds evidence that she was switched at birth, and separated from her twin, and must decide to either pursue it, or live the rest of her life wondering.

Wed, Feb. 16th, 2005, 04:21 am
kben: (no subject)

Suggested movies to watch for character:

Almost Famous
Donnie Darko
Rushmore
Adaptation
Fight Club
The Good Girl
Saved!
Thelma and Louise
The Breakfast Club

Who’s the main character? What are their flaws and strengths? What’s their overall goal? What’s their main conflict? Is it internal or external?

You don’t need to watch these particular films, they’re just the handful off the top of my head that are character driven. These questions should apply to any movie, even those on the Lifetime Movie Network.

Also, start paying attention to storylines. What’s the main plot? What are the subplots?

Is there a personified antagonist? Who/what is it? How do they/it hinder the protagonist’s goals?

If you feel like posting answers here, feel free. Also, you’re welcome to start discussion on anything mentioned here, specifically about the movies that may not seem to have a main character. Let’s get some hearty film student debates going. ;)

Tue, Feb. 15th, 2005, 10:20 pm
kben: (no subject)

By now you should have chosen your concept.

The next step is to further develop that concept and populate the world you’ve created.

This leads us to two questions:

What is your story?
Who is your main character?

StoryCollapse )

CharacterCollapse )



Next week we’ll start talking about outlining, so don’t forget to take some time to develop your story.

BrainstormingCollapse )

ETA: Please let us all know which concept you've chosen to work on. I know I'm curious to find out. :)

Questions, comments, and financial advice accepted here.

Sun, Feb. 13th, 2005, 03:17 pm
kben: (no subject)

Investments for the duration of the workshop:

Dictionary
Thesaurus
Book of Baby Names
Index Cards/Bulletin Board
Dry Erase Board

Now, I have been the starving writer for a good portion of my career, so I know that the idea of actually buying stuff can be, well, unthinkable. In which case, I suggest the alternate list:

Dictionary.com
Thesarus.com
BabyNamesDirectory.com
Post Its and a blank spot of wall
sheet of cardboard and a marker


The dictionary and thesaurus are just to keep you on your verbal game. Different characters use different words, depending on their education. An English professor wouldn't speak like a high school freshman (unless, maybe, that freshman lives in Capeside).

The baby names book/site is to keep the names fresh. Chose names that fit the character. The name Sarah draws up any number of potentially ordinary girls, but the name Buffy stands out as one name in all the world that may just stand between the forces of darkness and the world around her.

The index cards will help you index your scenes. When each scene is on a card, it's much easier to rearrange an outline than it is if you keep the whole outline on one page. The bulletin board is just a place to stick them. The Post Its and wall space serve the same purpose.

The dry erase board/cardboard just gives you a large space for jotting down ideas. Mirrors and windows also work well (just make sure that's a dry erase pen and not a Sharpie).

Sat, Feb. 12th, 2005, 03:02 pm
kben: (no subject)

I will be online most of the afternoon/evening if you have any questions or need any help. (AIM: writing is shiny)

Also, if you're interested in a group chat (which is an ideal setting to bounce around ideas), I'm willing to set one up, this evening or any other time.

Sat, Feb. 12th, 2005, 04:58 am
kben: (no subject)

Pop on over to Drew’s ScriptO-Rama or crack open your favorite screenplay. You’ll notice that your eyes are automatically drawn to the center column, which is where the dialogue lives.

Your dialogue is your calling card. Great dialogue can make or break a script. If your characters don’t sound natural when they speak, no one’s going to want to watch, let alone read, this movie.

This is an optional exercise, but I really encourage you to give it a shot. We used to do this in a playwriting class I was in and it can definitely help further ideas. I wish to God I could remember who it came from, but I really can’t.

Anyway, there was someone famous(ish) who stated that “anyone can write six lines of dialogue.” While I don’t necessarily agree (I’ve read some beyond lousy six lines in my day), it’s still a good way to break the proverbial ice and do some writing.

Also, it’s a swell way to get a sense of your writing style.


Six LinesCollapse )

I don't think I'll always be posting this often each week, but I just want to make sure I'm getting out all the right information for our twelve week journey.

Edited for clarification.

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